Trevor Horn & The Art of Noise – some links

Just reading about the Fairlight CMI, after our friend John Coyle sent us a link to ALL ITS SAMPLES FOR DOWNLOAD.

A bit of Googling just made sense of a tiny Fairlight-related narrative that I thought I’d drop into the blog…

  1. There’s Fairlight splattered all over Yes’s Trevor Horn-produced album 90125 (talk about guilty pleasures); it’s obvious on tracks like Owner Of A Lonely Heart  and Leave It (Spotify links).
  2. Various members of Horn’s production team went on to form The Art Of Noise, who Fairlighted up some of the drums from 90125 (have a listen around 3:00 of Leave It) to produce Beat Box.
  3. They remixed Beat Box, then gave it to Anne Dudley to arrange  a bit more musically, and out of that came Close (to the Edit), which made me crap myself stupid when I first heard it in 1984. The video’s bananas, too. I didn’t hear 90125 for another 18 months after that.

So there you go: chopping beats out of existing records, re-sampling, constructing tracks from chunks of noise. I don’t know how it feels, that falsetto-harmony-singing prog rockers invented most pre-computer sampling tricks half a decade before electronic dance musicians worked them out. Oh yes I do. It feels hilarious.

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Museum of Techno – Karaoke

Objective achieved – we rocked the broadcast hut seven times, and have completed our series of radio programmes for Resonance 104.4FM. Thanks to everyone who tuned in and gave us your more or less consistently rapturous feedback. Here is the final episode, Karaoke.

In this episode, the Technicians are charged with organising a night out for the Museum staff.

We discuss the impact on nightclubs, electronic music and other forms of group entertainment of communicable diseases like swine flu, and the fundamental links between the will to public performance, social satus and sexual success in various cultural contexts.

The show features the our customary guerilla sound design, including phonography from one of Croydon’s most generic pubs, and culminates in a rare live musical performance by Braidy and Cornwell – to the music of Mr David Powell.

Many thanks to everyone who’s contributed to the show, and to everyone who’s listened and given us your valuable feedback. We hope to be back soon with more over-produced yet underthought nonsense in the nearest possible future.

High-tech:

Medium tech:

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Museum on Resonance 104.4FM Tue 8 Sep 22:30(UK)

Good afternoon. Time for a final slice (for a while) of radio-related mayhem-cake from us.

Tonight at 22:30 UK / 17:30 EST / 14:30 US Pacific, the final episode in our current radio series will be broadcast on Resonance FM. It will be entitled “Karaoke.”

In this episode, the Technicians are charged with organising a night out for the Museum staff.

We discuss the impact on nightclubs, electronic music and other forms of group entertainment of communicable diseases like swine flu, and the fundamental links between the will to public performance, social satus and sexual success in various cultural contexts.

The show features the our customary guerilla sound design, including phonography from one of Croydon’s most generic pubs, and culminates in a rare live musical performance by Braidy and Cornwell – to the music of Mr David Powell.

Many thanks to everyone who’s contributed to the show, and to everyone who’s listened and given us your valuable feedback. We hope to be back soon with more over-produced yet underthought nonsense in the nearest possible future.

Oh – the show’s repeated at 15:30 UK time on Saturday, and archives are available on our Soundcloud page, http://soundcloud.com/museumoftechno.

Cheers, have a great week

Dave (Braidy)

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Museum of Techno – Mr Foley

With this week’s show about to be broadcast on Resonance FM tonight, we’re ready to upload last week’s episode, Mr Foley. The show features the work of guerilla foley artist, sound designer and mixer Steve Goldsmith (http://www.mrsteveproductions.com). He tells us how to wring a ghoulish sonic palette of violence from a bag of cheap veg; Cornwell and Braidy realise that sound effect design might represent a possible way to supplement their income; and they get a bit carried away.

High-tech:

Medium tech:

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Resonance FM 1 Sept 2009: Mr Foley

Tomorrow – 1 September – Museum of Techno returns to the airwaves, with the 5th instalment of our series of shows for Resonance 104.4FM. Entitled “Mr Foley,” the show features the work of guerilla foley artist, sound designer and mixer Stephen Goldsmith (http://mrsteveproductions.com), plus a number of violent acts committed against plants.

Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM

Tuesday 1 September 2009
22:30 (UK) | 17:30 (US Eastern) | 14:30 (US Pacific)

http://resonancefm.com/listen

Join us for the vegetable murderation.

Previously on Museum of Techno: Grime

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Let the day go

Sominex Advert

Croydon’s currently full of billboard adverts for Sominex, a brand of sleeping pill marketed with the phrase “Let the day go.”

The ads feature an image of a woman falling into blissful oblivion as icons of modern stress (like a sneaker, an iron, a senior female relative and a man on an office chair) float from her head and out of her open window into the starry, inky blue Croydon night.

I first noticed the posters on the day newspapers were reporting alleged claims by Conrad Murray that Michael Jackson died from from a self-administered Propofol overdose.

How about if what really killed Michael Jackson was that he wasn’t allowed to let go of things: fame, youth, the weirdness of his childhood; and that he used neurochemical cudgels like Propofol to beat down the shitty vibes that resulted from that failure to let go?

The letting go is what he needed. It wasn’t inherent in the Propofol; nor is it inherent in the fucking Sominex.

Kind regards

Mr Braidy

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Museum of Techno – Grime (+ summer holidays)

Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM

www.resonancefm.com/listen

Tuesdays – 22:30BST, 16:30EST, 14:30 US Pacific

Saturdays – 15:30BST, 09:30EST, 07:30 US Pacific

Now then. Now. Then. Now; then; and the future. Now and then.

Resonance FM has been off air for a week or two, while its engineering team carries out scheduled upgrades and maintenance. Therefore we have been blessed with a short break, two-thirds of the way through our radio series.

This has meant that I forgot to upload last week’s show. Which is a stupid thing, because it was actually the boom shit. So (a) steel yourself for next Tuesday’s show, which will rock hard, and (b) read on for an immediate fix of magical audio/deep wisdom.

Previously on the show

Here’s last week’s episode, Grime, in which we learn about the flow of music and energy within London’s maligned but burgeoning underground grime scene, during an amazing interview with Rinse FM DJ and Butterz blogger Elijah, and then demonstrating our knowledge of the scene in a discussion of its specialist vocabulary, the structure of its music and the best way for a producer to promote his/her music within the scene:

Nang.

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Museum of Techno On Resonance 104.4FM 4 August

Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM

www.resonancefm.com/listen

Tuesdays – 22:30BST, 16:30EST, 14:30 US Pacific

Saturdays – 15:30BST, 09:30EST, 07:30 US Pacific

We’ve been gasping to bring you some of our fiery wisdom about the cutting edge of London’s electronic youth music, and here it comes: this week, we’ll be talking to Rinse FM DJ and Butterz blogger Elijah about the trials and tribulations of trying to promote grime music in the teeth of a world recession and what might be described as less than 100% support from the local metropolitan police.

The Technicians, Cornwell and Braidy, present a linguistic analysis of grime lyrics, and discuss the mechanics of getting your tracks heard by grime MCs.

Previously on the show

Here’s last week’s episode, Valve Power:

It’s the mutt’s living nuts.

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Museum of Techno On Resonance 104.4FM 28 July

Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM

www.resonancefm.com/listen

Tuesdays – 22:30BST, 16:30EST, 14:30 US Pacific

Saturdays – 15:30BST, 09:30EST, 07:30 US Pacific

Back! Caught you looking for the same thing. And this week’s show does, admittedly, cover broadly similar topics in a not wildly inconsistent format. This week, we have a fascinating interview with North London analog electronics engineer Theo Argiriadis; we apply Theo’s advice about valves to improve the sound of our listeners’ early techno tracks, and the Museum’s toilets. Along the way, the Technicians learn some important truths about motorway service stations.

Previously on Museum of Techno Radio

Here’s last week’s episode, Hip Hop and Skin Conditions:

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New video on Youtube – Braidy’s tale

20 Jul 2009 | Comments (0) | General

In the final instalment of our current round of Sherry Sessions videos, Mr Braidy relates the harrowing tale of the circumstances in which he lost his job at Manchester’s Museum of Hard House.

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Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM 21 July

Shibbidy-bop. On July 21st at 22:30 UK time (18:30 Eastern US, 15:30 US Pacific), we broadcast the third instalment of Museum of Techno on Resonance 104.4FM.

Our topic was an in-depth discussion in two strands, relating to hip hop and common dermatological complaints. So engrossed in the discussion were we that we forgot to interview anyone this week. Our apologies go out to anyone.

Thanks for your hotly glowing feedback about the show so far: we hear that you have been “laughing like a mentalist, ” and judging our work “amazing”. Because we are useless at self-promotion, we would encourage you to tell all your friends – and, in fact, anyone within a 1-mile radius of your current geographical location – about us.

Here you may listen to and even download the episode, Hip Hop and Dermatology. We hope you enjoy it. Obviously you will: it rocks the hut.

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Museum of Techno on Resonance FM – Their Law

Set audio-enabled browsers to maximum bass: on Tuesday 14 July at 22:30 UK time, Museum of Techno – series 1 kicked off on Resonance FM.

Joining us for lunch in the Museum Cafe was writer, researcher and activist Jeremy Gilbert, with whom we assessed the power of the Rave as a political force and its run-in with the Criminal Justice Act 1994.

And the Technicians continued their re-categorisation of the Museum’s kick drum collection, offering their opinions and expertise on such topics as how ravers would perform in an actual civil war situation, dance music’s evolution to mainstream acceptability, and where to purchase post-club cornish pasties.

Here is an MP3 for your listening pleasure: on Soundcloud, and on the MoT website itself:

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Museum of Techno on Resonance FM – Pilot Episode

Yes in actual deed: in May we broadcast a pilot episode of our forthcoming radio series on Resonance FM. It rocked the hut, Resonance rewound and reloaded several times, the world screamed with love.

But all this adulation hasn’t yet resulted in any attention for us from those lovely lady clubbers, so we have decided to release the show in MP3 “podcast” format for your delectation and education.

The show features Museum Administrator, Diane Waymire, demonstrating our new audio tour system; the Technicians begin a major recategorisation of the Sir James Soame Collection of Booming Kickdrums; and we smash the sonic atom with Phil Durrant, who tells us about his history in piano house and hardcore rave production, and his subsequent journey into the minimal world of micro-improvisation.

It’s an awesome audio accomplishment, and we hope it rocks your world.

Kind regards

Mr Braidy
Technician, Museum of Techno

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Testing Twitter n Facebook

30 Jun 2009 | Comments (1) | General

Oh my actual days, we’re technologically integrated. We’ve managed to set up our website so that when we make a new post, it creates a blog post on our Myspace, and makes a tweet on Twitter. Furthermore, I’ve managed to set up Facebook so that it watches our Twitter, and then updates our Facebook status with the Twitter post.

Like some enormous house of electronic cards, just waiting to collapse. Hurrah.

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Religion and Electronic Dance Music

In recent Youtube videos Cornwell and I have discussed various topics relating to religion. Today, we were talking on the telephone about the many parallels between Christian church services and club nights.

It strikes me that the similarities are compelling. They don’t make sense from a religious viewpoint, of course – the idea that clubs, in which people meet, dance, shout, take mind-altering substances and cop off with each other are similar to churches would be offensive to many believers.

But believers are wrong, and the parallels between church and nightclub definitely make sense from a humanist, anthropological or otherwise scientific persepective:

  • Individuals assemble weekly in a group with a shared subculture
  • They execute movements and listen to sounds which they have trained themselves to know and love, which change the way they feel about the world, and which mark them out as a discrete social group
  • Clubbers like to do each other in the toilets, while the Catholic church has struggled deflect or talk down dozens of allegations of sexual abuse by its clergy of members of the congregation.

Viewed from this comparative viewpoint, it’s not qualitatively what happens that separates churches from nightclubs – it’s more a question of how much these things happen, the order in which they take place and where in the layouts of the venues (pews = dancefloor, pulpit = DJ booth, organ = sound system, vestry = toilet cubicle).

It crossed our minds that Christian raves and Christian dance music must either already exist, or be about to happen, so we did a cursory Google search and lo, it came to pass:

And here is a “trance remix” of a song published by Hillsong, the australian pentecostal megachurch:

Several thoughts cross my mind in relation to these videos.

First among them, of course, is the observation: “Oh, for fuck’s sake.”

But putting that to one side, do you notice how the Christian rave is at first glance similar to a secular rave, but, looking more closely, is subtlely yet obviously inferior in all regards? This is another reason for christians to be hesitant to accept fully rave culture into their religious practices – raves provide a possible portal through which churches might lose members, since they are like church services, but louder, longer, brighter, more honest, and with better sacrament.

Imagine turning up at a church, where believers are repeatedly told that flaccid, psychoactively inert flour wafers and weak, vinegar-like communion wine will cause them to become one with their God, and handing out a load of magic mushrooms. “Fuck, there’s no distinction between self and the world outside my body, and my mind is an expression of the natural workings of  the whole universe. There is no life, no death, either everything-including-me or nothing is god, and both amount to the same thing!” That would challenge the world-view of at least a few parishioners, I imagine.

Update 12 July 2009

There can be only one reason I didn’t include the following video in this post, the reason being that it makes all my points perfectly in 3 minutes, thus removing the point of me having made my post in the first place.

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